Reg Davidson

Portrait Mask

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  • Portrait Mask

Reg Davidson

Portrait Mask

Sold

This Portrait Mask is carved and painted by Reg Davidson from the Haida Nation. It has been carved in red cedar, painted with acrylic paint, has horsehair attached to the top of the mask, and features a Raven on the forehead of the human. There is a halibut design painted on the inside on the reverse side of the mask.

This mask is inspired by the Haida myth of the Blind Halibut Fisherman and Raven with a Broken Beak in which Raven attempts to play a joke on a blind fisherman. Mischievous and curious in nature, Raven is often considered “the trickster”. The myth tells of a blind man seated alone in a canoe tending to his fishing line. Raven, in an attempt to tease the fisherman, repeatedly pulls on the fishing line. On Raven’s final attempt, the fisherman suddenly pulls the line, catching Raven’s beak and breaking it off. Unsure of what had come upon his hook, the blind man asked his daughter to put the bill on a stick and raise it up above his house. An ashamed Raven emerged from the sea and tried to reattach the beak to his face, but it slipped and instead became attached to his chin, causing even more shame.

The mask including the horsehair is about 11 inches or 28 centimeters wide, 28 inches or 71 centimeters long and close to 5.5 inches or 14 centimeters deep. Without the hair the mask is 9 inches or over 23 centimeters wide, 12 inches or close to 31 centimeters long, and close to 5.5 inches or 14 centimeters deep. The mask was carved in 1989 and is in good condition. The small light dots on the black paint are reflections of light from the "sparkles" embedded in the black paint. The mask is signed and dated by the artist.

The final image shows the mask featured in the book "Spirit Faces: Contemporary Masks of the Northwest Coast" by Gary Wyatt, published in 1994.

The price includes shipping to the USA and Canada.