Moy Sutherland

Whaler Mask

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  • Whaler Mask

Moy Sutherland

Whaler Mask

Sold

This Whaler mask was carved in 2006 by Nuu-chah-nulth artist Moy Sutherland. The mask has been carved from red cedar and features orange, black, and brown acrylic paint, cedar bark for the hair, and operculum shells for the teeth. It has been adorned with cedar bark rope on either side of the mouth. On one side the cedar rope is attached to a harpoon head made of whale bone and on the other side of the mask the cedar rope is attached to a bladder, carved in red cedar.

The Nuu-chah-nulth are considered to be the only Northwest Coast First Nation to actively hunt whales. Traditionally, whalers would hunt humpback and California grey whales. Whales provided a significant range of important food and tool-making resources including blubber, meat, bone, gut, baleen, and sinew. But the hunting of whales presented significant challenges to the hunters and was considered a very dangerous undertaking. For these reasons, whaling was considered to be a prestigious and noble task.

Before a whale hunt would occur, the hunter would often undergo months of physical, mental and spiritual preparedness.

The mask not including the bark measures approximately 16 inches or 40 3/4 centimeters high, 10 1/2 inches or 26 3/4 centimeters wide, and 9 inches or 23 centimeters deep. With the bark the mask measures approximately 27 inches or 68 1/2 centimeters long, 20 inches or 50 3/4 centimeters wide, and 9 inches or 23 centimeters deep.

The price includes shipping to the USA and Canada.