Karver Everson

Kulus Headdress by Karver Everson

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  • Kulus Headdress by Karver Everson

Karver Everson

Kulus Headdress by Karver Everson

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This Kulus Headdress is carved by Native American artist Karver Everson from the K’ómoks and Kwakwaka´wakw Walas Kwaguł First Nation.

This headdress is carved in red cedar and painted in green, blue-green, red, black, and white acrylic. It has been finished with copper, abalone, cedar bark, and goose feathers. 

Kulus is the younger brother or sister of the supernatural Thunderbird and appears in its avian persona as a giant juvenile bird covered with white and brown feathers. Like the elder brother, he or she resides on mountain tops and has a primary diet of whales.

Kulus is often portrayed in the art and in the stories as having an abundance of feathery plumage, a thick coat of white down and often a bluish-green beak. Kulus is usually depicted with white feathers on the top of the head and in some cases, Thunderbird’s characteristic “horns” above its forehead, as Karver has created in this headdress.

Legendary stories about Kulus frequently recount how the bird gets so hot that it has a tendency to sweat profusely, at which time it is happy to shed its feathered cloak and become a supernatural human for a while.

In many origin stories, Kulus comes down from heaven, sheds its skin and becomes the founding ancestor of a tribe. Kulus teaches the people important dances and songs for their sacred winter ceremonials.

The mask is about 20 inches or 51 cm long, 11.5 inches or 29 cm high and 9 inches or 23cm  wide.

 The headdress does not include the stand shown. Please contact us if you are interested in purchasing the stand.

The price includes shipping to the continental USA and Canada.